some firsts

Standard

With Abby’s stay in the hospital, she "got" to experience many new things.

Wearing a surgical mask. 

Sleeping on a pillow.

An IV.

Playing with one of these toys (never had an interest till now).

(On a serious note, just like our stay in the hospital with Abby’s jaundice at birth, this time in the hospital humbled us to the fact that families live like this. We knew that when Abby perked up, we’d be heading home. Many families don’t have that promise, frequently carting very ill children to the hospital. Some of them living in these tiny rooms, helplessly watching their children deal with terminal illnesses. I just can’t imagine…

I pray that, through our encounter with hospital life, we can remember this community of people, who may struggle with finding encouragement in their day to day stress of hoping their children survive.)

Advertisements

4 responses »

  1. So true….reminds me of when we took Lizzie to Childrens Hospital when she was diagnosed with diabetes. I had to sit in the lobby cuz I had just finished chemo and they didn’t want me exposed to anything. As I sat in the lobby, angry and sad, those emotions were soon replaced with gratitude and humility as so many pass thru those doors with much greater challenges. I don’t think that minimizes our struggles, but it sure helps keep things in perspective. Nothing much more heartbreaking than a little person in a hospital. Love you all!

  2. It is all true….I think of families that have defects, disease when the children are born for the rest of his/her life!
    Unbelievable fortitude and love and GOD’s mercy needed to carry it through.

    Albeit, this was so upsetting and very scary to see our little one in those circumstances.

    After our skype this a.m., my heart lifted but was still torn and praying to GOD, that she can maintain her better health into great health soon!

    Joshie and Erin, these times are the real definition of PARENT!
    AND you both have surpassed what anyone would/could have done.

    all my love and prayers,
    gdell

  3. Ever notice that little ones can make the best of every situation? Seeing Abby sitting there with her arm strapped to that board playing with that toy reminds me of how resiliant our children really are. The first time Kaeden had an IV he was about 13 months, he had been up for 2 days throwing up and we were all exausted! They gave him the anti naseua and strapped his arm up and it only took him about 15 minutes to fall asleep. All I could do was worry, while he slept. Every time we take a trip to Children’s for a checkup (he sees 6 differnet doctors there yearly) we are reminded how lucky we are! The small issues that Kaeden has are no match to what we see there! There are children there who may not make it through the visit, let alone grow up to have families of their own!
    That was long, sorry…to conclude my story (lol) I agree that visits to the hospital with a sick but healthy child is very humbling. On top of that, you will remember this forever…Abby, on the other hand, may only remember the loving care she recieved, the extra cuddles and playing with a new toy. I pray this is the last hospital stay she will need for a VERY long time, if not forever! XOXO

  4. Ben’s has had 6 surgeries, 3 broken bones, Rachel’s had 2 surgeries plus her wisdom teeth pulled. I’d trade spots with them in a minute to take away their pain. But the most eye opening experience was taking Ben to a pediatric cardiologist – he had a valve prolapse which turned out to be there due to the heart growing in anticipation of a growth spurt. The waiting room was definitely not a place I wanted to have to sit in again.
    Erin – Abby’s situation reminds me of the story my mom tells me of when I was 6 months old I had the flu really bad and had to be hospitalized and on an I.V. It was my first Christmas and my 2 Grandma’s were very worried. The whole church was praying – and everything turned out fine. God is good!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s